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PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.
The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.
Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran
Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.
The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.
Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran
Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.
The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.
Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran
Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.
The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.
Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran
Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.
The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.
Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran
Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.
The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.
Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran
Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton

PFW REVIEW | NINA RICCI S/S 14

Peter Copping usually taps into Nina Ricci’s boy-girl spirit quite well, but I only saw half of it in this collection. The clothes were unapologetically girly in every traditional sense—sweet florals, explosive ruffles, and a dusty colour palette that told a satirical story of virgins and vixens, the perfect summation of Copping’s vision for the brand. The models had their hair tied back to reveal their glowing fresh faces, the women of the here and now. But the clothes were quite another story; they were the stuff of dreams and fairy tales.

The first half was all about creamy dresses that stopped just above the knee. Ruffles blossomed out of seams like flowers, feminising boxy cropped jackets and modern tailcoats in the most romantic way possible. Blouses were sheer to reveal skin, and hinted to their smooth sensation, but chiffon panels and layers of lace prevented the clothes from revealing too much. Indeed, this innocent voyeuristic game continued throughout all 48 looks: lace dresses peeked out from underneath jackets, sheer dresses exposed undergarments, and a sweeping lacy gown revealed just part of the bosom and thigh. This may be Copping’s most erotic collection to date.

Consider this in regard to the bare-chested FEMEN protesters who stormed the catwalk and the contrast is even more clear. The Nina Ricci girl is just as clear in her position but less overt in her proposal. She is not loud or obstreperous, but leave her to her own devices and she has the charm to ensnare an audiences wherever she goes. This is only natural for a brand with such deep roots in the fragrance business, where a silent scent is engineered to make the loudest statement. And this collection worked the same way: it was a muted, modest, sensual, and its beauty really speaks for itself.

Text: Hung Tran

Photo: Caroline Levy-Bencheton

(Source: bite-zine.com)

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  • October 09
  • 04:01pm